New Genes Revealed for Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers discover 3 new genes for type 1 diabetes in large data analysis

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- New genes associated with type 1 diabetes have been uncovered in a large-scale analysis of genetic data related to the disease.

Researchers from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia examined six large databases for DNA data from about 10,000 people with type 1 diabetes and 17,000 healthy people.

In addition to validating results from previous research, the study authors identified three new mutations in genes involved in protein-protein interactions, inflammation and cell-signaling activity.

The researchers said they didn't expect to find that these gene mutations had any link to type 1 diabetes.

The findings, published online in the Sept. 29 issue of the journal PLoS Genetics, add to overall knowledge about the gene networks involved in type 1 diabetes. A greater understanding of the fundamental biology of the disease could eventually lead to new treatments, the researchers suggested in a hospital news release.

About 200 million people worldwide have type 1 diabetes and must take frequent insulin injections to control their blood sugar levels.

More information

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International has more about type 1 diabetes.

Robert Preidt SOURCE: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, news release, Sept. 23, 2011

Related Articles

Learn More About Sharp
Sharp HealthCare is San Diego's health care leader with seven hospitals, two medical groups and a health plan. Learn more about our San Diego hospitals, choose a Sharp-affiliated San Diego doctor or browse our comprehensive medical services.

Health News is provided as a service to Sharp Web site users by HealthDay. Sharp HealthCare nor its employees, agents, or contractors, review, control, or take responsibility for the content of these articles. Please read the Terms of Use for more information.