Eating Out Doesn't Have to Mean Excess Calories

Choose grilled over fried foods, and hold the cheese, mayo and creamy salad dressings

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- While the holidays tend to translate into restaurant meals that are bigger and higher in calories than those prepared at home, eating out doesn't have to be unhealthy, an expert says.

Making wise choices at restaurants can prevent Americans from consuming hundreds of extra calories.

"The average American consumes close to 50 percent of his or her meals outside of the home and fast-food restaurants are abundant," said Dr. Jessica Bartfield, an internist who specializes in nutrition and weight management at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, in a Loyola University Health System news release."By following a few rules, you can keep any fast food meal in calorie check."

When choosing a restaurant, Bartfield recommends sandwich shops that offer vegetable toppings, which can add vitamins and nutrients to a quick meal. "I am also a fan of fast-food places that offer soup or even chili as soup can be a terrific option, particularly ones loaded with veggies, lean meats and beans," she said. "Be careful to avoid the cream- or cheese-based soups and beware the bread bowl, which can increase the calories by up to 1,000."

Bartfield offered these fast-food menu tips to help Americans stay healthy:

  • Choose grilled, not fried. Choosing foods that are grilled can save 280 calories and 27 grams of fat.
  • Hold the high-fat extras. Cheese, mayonnaise and salad dressings can pack on up to 100 calories per serving. Avoid these extra ingredients unless low-fat versions are available.
  • Order small sizes. Opt for smaller portions and single burgers, rather than double or bonus sizes.
  • Avoid sugary drinks. These empty calories add up quickly and offer no nutritional value.
  • Save half for later. Wrap up the uneaten portion of your meal and have it for your next meal to save money and calories.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides more information on nutrition.

Mary Elizabeth Dallas SOURCE: Loyola University Health System, news release, December 2011

Related Articles

Learn More About Sharp
Sharp HealthCare is San Diego's health care leader with seven hospitals, two medical groups and a health plan. Learn more about our San Diego hospitals, choose a Sharp-affiliated San Diego doctor or browse our comprehensive medical services.

Health News is provided as a service to Sharp Web site users by HealthDay. Sharp HealthCare nor its employees, agents, or contractors, review, control, or take responsibility for the content of these articles. Please read the Terms of Use for more information.