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Sharp Health News

Fight the bite (infographic)

Sept. 23, 2016

With a recent uptick in U.S.-based Zika cases, mosquitoes and bug-bite protection have flown into the limelight. Keep yourself safe from mosquito-borne illnesses with these tips from Christina Khaokham, an infection control specialist with Sharp Rees-Stealy Medical Group.

Fight the bite (infographic) Ban the bite! – Preventing Zika and other mosquito-borne illnesses.
Mosquitoes may be small, but their bites lead to more than 1 million deaths around the world each year. Lower your odds of transmitting Zika and other illnesses by keeping mosquitoes at bay. Zika decoded. Zika is a virus linked to microcephaly, a birth defect in babies. Women who are pregnant or want to get pregnant are most at risk and should be wary of mosquito bites. Zika is spread through bites from infected mosquitoes. It is prevalent mostly in the Americas, with cases in the Pacific Islands, Africa and Singapore. The mosquitoes feed during daylight hours but can also bite at night. Of those infected  with Zika, 20 percent experience cold-like symptoms. Eighty percent experience no symptoms. Consult your health care provider with any concerns about mosquito bites, especially if you’re pregnant or want to be pregnant. Pregnant women should avoid travel to Zika-affected areas,” says Christina Khaokham, MSN, MPH, an infection control specialist at Sharp Rees-Stealy. If you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant and must travel to one of these areas, talk to your health care provider first and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites during your trip.” Protect yourself from mosquito bites by wearing long sleeves and pants, securing window screens, dumping standing water, and using insect repellent. The right repellent is EPA-registered, at least 20 percent DEET, used according to instructions, applied after sunscreen has dried and reapplied as directed. Zika can also be transmitted through sexual contact. If you have a partner who lives in or has traveled to an area with Zika, consult your health care provider for guidance.

View the printable version of this infographic.

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