Doctor's office
Enter your doctor's name to get office information.
Find labs in your network
Enter your primary care doctor's name to find labs in your network.
Find urgent care centers in your network
Enter your primary care doctor's name to find urgent care centers in your network.
FollowMyHealth®
Driving Directions
Cart
Update Information
Forgot Password

Please enter your e-mail address.

Sharp Health News

Peanut butter: the good, bad and alternatives (infographic)

Jan. 22, 2016

Peanut butter is consumed in 94 percent of U.S. households. In fact, the average child will eat 1,500 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches before he or she graduates high school. Although it's packed with protein, some peanut butter varieties also have added sugar, sodium and preservatives — so it's best to check the labels.

Patti Ennis, a registered dietitian at Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center, sets the record straight — and offers three tasty nut butter alternatives for those with peanut allergies.

Source: National Peanut Board

Peanut butter: the good, bad and alternatives (infographic). Whether it’s creamy or crunchy, peanut butter is an American staple. But is it good for you? We put its health benefits to the test – and examine three tasty alternatives to shake up your nut butter cravings. Peanut butters. Peanut butters are high in protein and peanuts can lower your risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes when incorporated as part of a healthy diet. However, some peanut butters have added ingredients – so read the labels and eat it in moderation. Regular peanut butter receives a health rating of three out of five because of the added sugar, sodium and oils. There are 190 calories, 16 grams of fat, 7 grams of protein and 3 grams of sugar per 2 tablespoons of regular peanut butter.  Unsalted, natural peanut butter receives the health rating of five out of five because it is made of just peanuts. It has 180 calories, 16 grams of fat, 7 grams of protein in 1 gram of sugar per 2 tablespoons. Peanut butter with jelly swirl receives a one out of five health rating because of the added sugars, sodium and preservatives. It has 240 cal, 16 g of fat, 7 g of protein and 21 g of sugar per 2-tablespoon serving. Other nut butters. If you have a peanut allergy or just like to mix it up, here are some tasty alternatives: Almond butter has twice the fiber of peanut butter. There are 190 calories, 18 grams of fat, 7 grams of protein and 3 grams of sugar per 2-tablespoons serving. Walnut butter is higher in omega-3 fatty acids than peanut butter. It has 205 calories, 19 grams of fat, 5 grams of protein and 1 gram of sugar per 2 tablespoons. Hazelnut butter is an option for those with peanut allergies. There are 210 calories, 13 grams of fat, 2 grams of protein and 2 grams of sugar per 2 tablespoons. For any diet regimen, proper portion control is key, says Patty Ennis, a registered dietitian and the clinical nutrition program manager at Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center. The MyPlate guidelines recommend eating 4 ounces of nuts or seeds per week. So incorporating nut butters into a daily diet is OK; just be sure to consume only 2 tablespoons a day. Sources: Lucky Vitamin, USDA, Jif and Smuckers

View the printable version of this infographic.

You might also like:

Choose the doctor who's right for you.

At Sharp, we make it easy to find an exceptional doctor — right where you live and work.

All Categories
Contact Sharp HealthCare
Call us

1-800-827-4277

If this is a life- or limb-threatening emergency, please call 911 immediately.


Email us

Please do not use this form to convey personal or medical information.

How would you like to be contacted?
Date of birth
Optional


Find other numbers

View our phone directory

What's This?

These important numbers are located on your billing statement.

Find your Sharp Rees-Stealy account number

Find your Sharp Rees-Stealy account number

Find your Sharp hospital account number

Find your Sharp hospital account number

Find your SharpCare account number

Find your SharpCare account number
Lung Cancer Screening

Should you get a lung cancer screening? Answer a few simple questions to find out.

Have you ever smoked cigarettes?
Are you on Medicare or a Medicare HMO?