Doctor's office
Enter your doctor's name to get office information.
Find labs in your network
Enter your primary care doctor's name to find labs in your network.
Find urgent care centers in your network
Enter your primary care doctor's name to find urgent care centers in your network.
FollowMyHealth®
Driving Directions
Cart
Update Information
Forgot Password

Please enter your e-mail address.

Sharp Health News

What to do when someone has a heart attack (infographic)

Sept. 29, 2015

According to the Centers for Disease Control, someone has a heart attack in the U.S. every 42 seconds. Be prepared to help a friend or loved one with these simple tips from Dr. Julie Phillips, a Sharp-affiliated emergency medicine physician.

What to do when someone has a heart attack (infographic). What to do when someone is having a heart attack. Heart disease affects the health of Americans every minute of every day. In fact, someone in the U.S. has a heart attack every 42 seconds or dies from a heart disease-related event every 60 seconds. The direct and indirect costs of heart disease total more than $320 billion. Experts report that more than 700,000 people suffer heart attacks each year. If a friend or loved one suddenly had a heart attack, would you know how to help? These simple tips could make you a lifesaver – instead of a bystander – until help arrives: Assess the situation. The following signals mean it’s time to act: Chest discomfort, Upper body discomfort, Shortness of breath, Cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness, Back or jaw pain. Call 911. Remain calm and explain what is happening to the dispatcher. If a person is having chest pain, call 911 immediately, says Dr. Julie Phillips, a Sharp-affiliated emergency medicine physician. Don’t try to transport them to the hospital yourself. Give them aspirin. If the person is awake and can swallow, ask if they can take aspirin to help keep their blood from clotting. Have them chew one regular strength or two baby aspirin. Find an AED. Located in many public facilities (including gyms), an automatic external defibrillator (AED) has simple instructions and can help save a life before medical help arrives. If the person is gasping or short of breath and does not respond when you talk to them or tap their shoulder, turn on the AED and follow the prompts. If there’s no AED nearby, you may need to perform CPR. If you are not trained, we encourage you to take a class. Find the right class for you by visiting www.sharp.com/cpr.

View the printable version of this infographic.

You might also like:

Choose the doctor who's right for you.

At Sharp, we make it easy to find an exceptional doctor — right where you live and work.

All Categories
Contact Sharp HealthCare
Call us

1-800-827-4277

If this is a life- or limb-threatening emergency, please call 911 immediately.


Email us

Please do not use this form to convey personal or medical information.

How would you like to be contacted?
Date of birth
Optional


Find other numbers

View our phone directory

What's This?

These important numbers are located on your billing statement.

Find your Sharp Rees-Stealy account number

Find your Sharp Rees-Stealy account number

Find your Sharp hospital account number

Find your Sharp hospital account number

Find your SharpCare account number

Find your SharpCare account number
Lung Cancer Screening

Should you get a lung cancer screening? Answer a few simple questions to find out.

Have you ever smoked cigarettes?
Are you on Medicare or a Medicare HMO?